My Phone of the Year

Now that’s a fair amount of linkbait right there, but before I reveal which handset I’m going to bestow such a high prize upon (chortle), let’s first cover off those who definitely haven’t won my phone of the year.

Loser
Loser

The first phone it’s definitely not, is the iPhone.

Before you all launch into the whole ‘iPhone is the best thing in the world’ spiel and flame me from here well into 2012, just stop and think. The iPhone was – and arguably still very much is in its 3GS form – a luxury device.

Costing at the absolute minimum £300 – £400 either on PAYG or on contract, the iPhone has priced itself out of the competition by attempting to manufacture an allure of exclusivity. Yes, the iPhone is a great handset, but phone of the year it is not.

Nor for that matter, is the HTC Hero.

An Android device heralded by some as the best yet, after having a hands-on, I must say that I still prefer the HTC Magic. Either way, the still ‘in beta’ Android OS is yet to break into the hearts and minds of the mass-market. Though I have a very strong suspicion that – what with the upcoming Nexus launch next month and the apparently awesome work that the Motorola Droid is doing stateside – Android will truly arrive in 2010.

What about the Palm Pre? Er…Not a chance.

Which of course, leaves us with Nokia.

Is it the N97?
No. The early firmware troubles playing a key factor here, leaving the mobile users of the world divided. The mini may yet turn things around, but has arrived too late for this party.

Could it be the N86 8MP?
Close, very close in fact. For me, the N86 would have snagged it, but you simply don’t see it anywhere. I know that I personally have been responsible for at least ten sales of the N86 from an extended network of friends reading the N86 review I wrote earlier this year. However, the networks didn’t buy into it and – as we all know – without operator backing, nothing sells.

So what does that leave us with?

Of course, the N900 – right? Wrong. The N900 has only just been released! So how on earth could it even be a contender? Even though Dan loves his and I love mine, here – the N900 does not win. Not this year anyway.

No, the handset that I’ve chosen as my phone of the year is…

The Nokia 5800

TA-DA!

This phone, launched in January 2009, brought touchscreen smartphones to the masses in a way that no other handset has yet to reproduce. Two years ago, such an accolade would have gone to the Nokia N95; ubiquitous, funtional and a big step towards change in the mobile computing world. You couldn’t move for N95s when you asked anyone what phone they had.

For me, this year (and based on entirely the same science), the 5800 snags it.

I’ve had one in my possession since around March or April, and I am STILL using it. Be it as a secondary device or as an email device, this small yet functional phone is the 2009 equivalent of the N95, no scratch that – the N73. Not the best in class by any stretch, but pitched at exactly the right price, at exactly the right market, this handset has sold by the bucket load. The 5800 has repeated that success. On the tube, on the bus, in the pub and on the street, I see the 5800 everywhere.

Available for less than £200 SIM free, the 5800 is a fantastic entry level device for all ages. Featuring a surprisingly capable 3.2mp camera, Nokia’s first touch screen (and forerunner to the Xseries range), is still to this day a regular in my pocket. Its design is simple yet durable and  is perfect for the days when you just need something to last all day, without fear of crashing halfway through an important call/email.

It’s light, cheap and it just works.

For me, the 5800 is my 2009 Phone of the Year.

What’s yours?

Last updated by at .

Author: James Whatley

Chief Strategy Officer in adland. I got ❤️ for writing, gaming, and figuring stuff out. I'm @whatleydude pretty much everywhere that matters. Nice to meet you x

305 thoughts on “My Phone of the Year”

  1. The criteria being used – throughout both article and comments – are so diverse that this one could run and run indefinitely.

    Clearly mobile phones elicit a fervour never seen for things like DVD players, washing machines or WiFi access points. This speaks strongly to the relationship that humans have with them – and how carefully and cleverly they are marketed and segmented to different social groups.

    (I think most commentators are surprised simply because they hadn't put James down to being in the classic 5800 demographic, not because it's a particularly bad device)

    This is all good of course. But in your zeal, please spare a thought for the poor app and mobile web developers who have to continue to provide services for all of you and your diverse pocket-shaped passions 😉

  2. This is possibly my favourite comment so far. I really like the gentle nudge that you give to the relationship aspect that arguably *all* humans have with their handsets. Something that is hard to design for, hard to predict and certainly, as you point out, hard to develop for.

    Who knows what we’ll see over the next five years or so, what will remain the same is this key dynamic that is central to any success; the relationship it has with its owner.

  3. Yeah it occurred to me, but it's completely irrelevant to my argument so I didn't mention it. My point is that the phone of the year for me is one that has influenced many others, including the 5800.

  4. Yeah it occurred to me, but it's completely irrelevant to my argument so I didn't mention it. My point is that the phone of the year for me is one that has influenced many others, including the 5800.

  5. I didn't make any reference to the iPhone being a fashion statement. I said it's influence was extended to many other handset segments and manufacturers.

  6. I didn't make any reference to the iPhone being a fashion statement. I said it's influence was extended to many other handset segments and manufacturers.

  7. hel yeah 5800s!!! i am absolutly in love with mine and reccomend that anyone who is thinking about buying one get it!!!! ifone sucks!!

  8. This is possibly my favourite comment so far. I really like the gentle nudge that you give to the relationship aspect that arguably *all* humans have with their handsets. Something that is hard to design for, hard to predict and certainly, as you point out, hard to develop for. Who knows what we'll see over the next five years or so, what will remain the same is this key dynamic that is central to any success; the relationship it has with its owner.

  9. This is possibly my favourite comment so far. I really like the gentle nudge that you give to the relationship aspect that arguably *all* humans have with their handsets. Something that is hard to design for, hard to predict and certainly, as you point out, hard to develop for.

    Who knows what we'll see over the next five years or so, what will remain the same is this key dynamic that is central to any success; the relationship it has with its owner.

  10. hel yeah 5800s!!! i am absolutly in love with mine and reccomend that anyone who is thinking about buying one get it!!!! ifone sucks!!

  11. hel yeah 5800s!!! i am absolutly in love with mine and reccomend that anyone who is thinking about buying one get it!!!! ifone sucks!!

  12. It’s a pretty cheap shot to call the 5800 “phone of the year” over the obscenely-superior 3GS without clearly qualifying that there’s a price limit in play, especially when the price difference is apparently local to the UK. Here in the admittedly-screwed-up United States, a 16GB 3GS will run you $199 (~£124) on contract, and dodging the $30/month charge for data is just as easy (or difficult, depending on your personality) as it is when using any other GSM/UMTS smartphone.

    Granted, the 5800 NAM would be moving for “free” on contract if it was sold by a carrier here, and I’ll admit that I routinely recommend that folks who think they want to put up with Symbian get a cheap 3GS with their contract and dump it on eBay/HowardForums to subsidize the purchase of something from Nokia. But the point remains that at least in this part of the world, the cost of the 3GS is actually the “cheap” part and is used as the dubious carrot that sucks so many Americans into paying obnoxious prices for their service. AT&T and Verizon are horrible companies, but that’s a constant for customers here.

    This is absolutely subjective, but in my mind a “phone of the year” exemplifies the best product, not the stuffer that landed in the most stockings. If the latter were the case, why not nominate some shitty 2009 dumbphone that moved crazy units, too?

    For pure prestige, the competitors are very clearly the 3GS, the N900, and the Motorola Droid (unless you don’t want to count it until a proper UMTS version drops, which is legitimate). Mobile software development was quite obviously 2009’s focus, and I think it’s apparent that Android, iPhone OS, and Maemo have the brightest futures in that department — and for as painful an admission as it is, iPhone OS has the best present. We’d all like an Android phone or an iPhone with the N86’s camera, but it’s downright ridiculous to suggest that another S60 catastrophe is a viable purchase at this stage in the game.

    Nokia has made a business out of abusively flooding the market with devices and then intentionally fragmenting software features even though the “OS” is allegedly the same. Half the fun of owning a smartphone is watching it get better along the way, and it shouldn’t take more than a quick look to Fruit’s original Jesusphone 2007 edition which has been steadily supported, can still run most of the latest software, and still commands a high resale value to see that. People upgraded for worthwhile hardware improvements that arguably should have been in the first iteration (3G, GPS, video recording), but they didn’t get hoodwinked into buying a product that’s going to fade into obscurity just as many Nokias do. HTC pulls this gambit with Windows Mobile, but they’ve at least got the fine folks at xda-developers to bail them out. Nokia customers have no such trump card.

    If you’ve only got £200 to spend on a smartphone, settle for the HTC Hero with the full understanding that you’re buying a 2008-level rehash with a headphone jack slapped on. Better yet, find a way to save up another £200 and invest in a smartphone worth owning.

    Brendan Reply:

    “This is absolutely subjective, but in my mind a “phone of the year” exemplifies the best product, not the stuffer that landed in the most stockings. If the latter were the case, why not nominate some shitty 2009 dumbphone that moved crazy units, too?”

    You’ve not caught on that the point of this article is that the 5800 does a lot for less (I don’t understand what kind of wizardry you use to get the iPhone for $200 and then avoid the contract, but I assume it falls under ‘theft’). It’s not about price OR quality, it’s about both put together.

    “If you’ve only got £200 to spend on a smartphone, settle for the HTC Hero with the full understanding that you’re buying a 2008-level rehash with a headphone jack slapped on. Better yet, find a way to save up another £200 and invest in a smartphone worth owning.”

    On what planet does the HTC Hero cost £200?! I guess it’s the same one you got that iPhone from.

    As for Nokia deliberately fragmenting software features, you do realise that one of the reasons why the ‘two taps’ interaction mode for list items in S60 5th edition is there was a vain attempt to keep compatability? If you do actually want to live in a world where every manufacturer makes essentially one device and ‘maintains compatability’ forever and ever than fine. You should have a little think about the implications though…

  13. Ben, if you’re talking about the iPhone 3G – which I think is definitely the phone of 2008 – you’re right. All the points you mention refer to events that happened in 2007 or 2008 – the challenging of the carriers, the launch of the app store, etc. so when you’re talking about trading on past glories then you may want to bear that in mind.

    The main point where you fall down though is the assumption that people are somehow conned into buying the 5800 and don’t even consider other options out of ignorance. To me that’s a remarkably blinkered and cynical view.

    I suspect most people buy their phones after considering the holy trinity of price, utility and coolness. For some people that’ll mean the iPhone, for others it’ll be the Hero and for others still it’ll be the 5800. I’m sure some people bought the 5800 because it was a dummy handset on the wall and Nokia have a good name, however I’m equally sure some people bought the iPhone based on the massive advertising campaign that Apple undertook and never actually used an iPhone either. Presenting only one side of the coin kind of diminishes your argument.

  14. If you re-read my post, you’ll see that I said $199 on-contract (not off) for the 3GS, which is what it costs here — in response to James’ sentiment that the 3GS was too expensive because it’s “absolute minimum £300 – £400 either on PAYG or on contract.” I’ll admit I’m not sure what a UMTS HTC Hero costs you guys over there; the CDMA version (which is the only 3G-capable version we can use here in the U.S.) is moving on eBay right now for $325 USD (£201), and since James didn’t complain about the Hero’s cost in his initial posting I’m assuming it’s “fine” for the purpose of this abstract exercise where phones are crowned champion on the guise of some imaginary MSRP guideline.

    As for the Nokia predicament, I’m not talking S60 3rd vs. S60 5th and you know it. I own an E70-2 that will never see S60 3rd FP1 (or even the small updates the E70-1 saw, for no good reason), and an N82 that will never see FP2 even though the hardware is plenty capable. We regularly see mindbendingly poor choices with software exclusions, too: ask recent Eseries device owners how they like the Podcasting app situation.

    I’m not saying Google’s gotten it right with Android, because there’s absolutely fragmentation in that ecosystem. But it’s quite plain to see that they’ve got a better software deployment path moving forward: Android Market vs. Ovi Store and a tangled mess of developer websites is a no-brainer decision. Additionally, HTC’s Android devices — just like their Windows Mobile devices — are routinely hacked and updated courtesy of the folks at xda-developers, so we know there’s at least -some- software upgrade path, even if Google and the manufacturer both fail to provide it.

  15. Phone of year is samsung i8910 omnia hd!a fantastic amoled screen with amoled touchscreen..player with divx codec, very good camera for video and foto (not so much at 1280×720 in this moment, but maybe the best a 720×480!), gps very fast, phone very fast (cortex a8 cpu),nice interface with widget, task 3d, POSSIBILITY OF COOKING ROM AS WINDOWS MOBILE (first time for a symbian phone), radio fm with mp4 recording, very good music player with 5.1 surround feature,from january with kinetic scroll in every part of menù..THE BEST

  16. It's a pretty cheap shot to call the 5800 “phone of the year” over the obscenely-superior 3GS without clearly qualifying that there's a price limit in play, especially when the price difference is apparently local to the UK. Here in the admittedly-screwed-up United States, a 16GB 3GS will run you $199 (~£124) on contract, and dodging the $30/month charge for data is just as easy (or difficult, depending on your personality) as it is when using any other GSM/UMTS smartphone.Granted, the 5800 NAM would be moving for “free” on contract if it was sold by a carrier here, and I'll admit that I routinely recommend that folks who think they want to put up with Symbian get a cheap 3GS with their contract and dump it on eBay/HowardForums to subsidize the purchase of something from Nokia. But the point remains that at least in this part of the world, the cost of the 3GS is actually the “cheap” part and is used as the dubious carrot that sucks so many Americans into paying obnoxious prices for their service. AT&T and Verizon are horrible companies, but that's a constant for customers here.This is absolutely subjective, but in my mind a “phone of the year” exemplifies the best product, not the stuffer that landed in the most stockings. If the latter were the case, why not nominate some shitty 2009 dumbphone that moved crazy units, too?For pure prestige, the competitors are very clearly the 3GS, the N900, and the Motorola Droid (unless you don't want to count it until a proper UMTS version drops, which is legitimate). Mobile software development was quite obviously 2009's focus, and I think it's apparent that Android, iPhone OS, and Maemo have the brightest futures in that department — and for as painful an admission as it is, iPhone OS has the best present. We'd all like an Android phone or an iPhone with the N86's camera, but it's downright ridiculous to suggest that another S60 catastrophe is a viable purchase at this stage in the game.Nokia has made a business out of abusively flooding the market with devices and then intentionally fragmenting software features even though the “OS” is allegedly the same. Half the fun of owning a smartphone is watching it get better along the way, and it shouldn't take more than a quick look to Fruit's original Jesusphone 2007 edition which has been steadily supported, can still run most of the latest software, and still commands a high resale value to see that. People upgraded for worthwhile hardware improvements that arguably should have been in the first iteration (3G, GPS, video recording), but they didn't get hoodwinked into buying a product that's going to fade into obscurity just as many Nokias do. HTC pulls this gambit with Windows Mobile, but they've at least got the fine folks at xda-developers to bail them out. Nokia customers have no such trump card.If you've only got £200 to spend on a smartphone, settle for the HTC Hero with the full understanding that you're buying a 2008-level rehash with a headphone jack slapped on. Better yet, find a way to save up another £200 and invest in a smartphone worth owning.

  17. It's a pretty cheap shot to call the 5800 “phone of the year” over the obscenely-superior 3GS without clearly qualifying that there's a price limit in play, especially when the price difference is apparently local to the UK. Here in the admittedly-screwed-up United States, a 16GB 3GS will run you $199 (~£124) on contract, and dodging the $30/month charge for data is just as easy (or difficult, depending on your personality) as it is when using any other GSM/UMTS smartphone.

    Granted, the 5800 NAM would be moving for “free” on contract if it was sold by a carrier here, and I'll admit that I routinely recommend that folks who think they want to put up with Symbian get a cheap 3GS with their contract and dump it on eBay/HowardForums to subsidize the purchase of something from Nokia. But the point remains that at least in this part of the world, the cost of the 3GS is actually the “cheap” part and is used as the dubious carrot that sucks so many Americans into paying obnoxious prices for their service. AT&T and Verizon are horrible companies, but that's a constant for customers here.

    This is absolutely subjective, but in my mind a “phone of the year” exemplifies the best product, not the stuffer that landed in the most stockings. If the latter were the case, why not nominate some shitty 2009 dumbphone that moved crazy units, too?

    For pure prestige, the competitors are very clearly the 3GS, the N900, and the Motorola Droid (unless you don't want to count it until a proper UMTS version drops, which is legitimate). Mobile software development was quite obviously 2009's focus, and I think it's apparent that Android, iPhone OS, and Maemo have the brightest futures in that department — and for as painful an admission as it is, iPhone OS has the best present. We'd all like an Android phone or an iPhone with the N86's camera, but it's downright ridiculous to suggest that another S60 catastrophe is a viable purchase at this stage in the game.

    Nokia has made a business out of abusively flooding the market with devices and then intentionally fragmenting software features even though the “OS” is allegedly the same. Half the fun of owning a smartphone is watching it get better along the way, and it shouldn't take more than a quick look to Fruit's original Jesusphone 2007 edition which has been steadily supported, can still run most of the latest software, and still commands a high resale value to see that. People upgraded for worthwhile hardware improvements that arguably should have been in the first iteration (3G, GPS, video recording), but they didn't get hoodwinked into buying a product that's going to fade into obscurity just as many Nokias do. HTC pulls this gambit with Windows Mobile, but they've at least got the fine folks at xda-developers to bail them out. Nokia customers have no such trump card.

    If you've only got £200 to spend on a smartphone, settle for the HTC Hero with the full understanding that you're buying a 2008-level rehash with a headphone jack slapped on. Better yet, find a way to save up another £200 and invest in a smartphone worth owning.

  18. I complete agree with you that the 5800 is the most underestimated device in Nokia’s current portfolio. I also agree that the N86 is a phenomenal multimedia device. Pity that the networks did not support it so widely as you say.

    I would also add that the standard of feature devices running on proprietary interfaces has also vastly improved offering practicality and value for those simply wishing to have a right out of the box solution without being interested in customisation.

    2010 will be a very interesting year in the development of all these product segments.

  19. Ben, if you're talking about the iPhone 3G – which I think is definitely the phone of 2008 – you're right. All the points you mention refer to events that happened in 2007 or 2008 – the challenging of the carriers, the launch of the app store, etc. so when you're talking about trading on past glories then you may want to bear that in mind.The main point where you fall down though is the assumption that people are somehow conned into buying the 5800 and don't even consider other options out of ignorance. To me that's a remarkably blinkered and cynical view. I suspect most people buy their phones after considering the holy trinity of price, utility and coolness. For some people that'll mean the iPhone, for others it'll be the Hero and for others still it'll be the 5800. I'm sure some people bought the 5800 because it was a dummy handset on the wall and Nokia have a good name, however I'm equally sure some people bought the iPhone based on the massive advertising campaign that Apple undertook and never actually used an iPhone either. Presenting only one side of the coin kind of diminishes your argument.

  20. Ben, if you're talking about the iPhone 3G – which I think is definitely the phone of 2008 – you're right. All the points you mention refer to events that happened in 2007 or 2008 – the challenging of the carriers, the launch of the app store, etc. so when you're talking about trading on past glories then you may want to bear that in mind.

    The main point where you fall down though is the assumption that people are somehow conned into buying the 5800 and don't even consider other options out of ignorance. To me that's a remarkably blinkered and cynical view.

    I suspect most people buy their phones after considering the holy trinity of price, utility and coolness. For some people that'll mean the iPhone, for others it'll be the Hero and for others still it'll be the 5800. I'm sure some people bought the 5800 because it was a dummy handset on the wall and Nokia have a good name, however I'm equally sure some people bought the iPhone based on the massive advertising campaign that Apple undertook and never actually used an iPhone either. Presenting only one side of the coin kind of diminishes your argument.

  21. “This is absolutely subjective, but in my mind a “phone of the year” exemplifies the best product, not the stuffer that landed in the most stockings. If the latter were the case, why not nominate some shitty 2009 dumbphone that moved crazy units, too?”You've not caught on that the point of this article is that the 5800 does a lot for less (I don't understand what kind of wizardry you use to get the iPhone for $200 and then avoid the contract, but I assume it falls under 'theft'). It's not about price OR quality, it's about both put together. “If you've only got £200 to spend on a smartphone, settle for the HTC Hero with the full understanding that you're buying a 2008-level rehash with a headphone jack slapped on. Better yet, find a way to save up another £200 and invest in a smartphone worth owning.”On what planet does the HTC Hero cost £200?! I guess it's the same one you got that iPhone from. As for Nokia deliberately fragmenting software features, you do realise that one of the reasons why the 'two taps' interaction mode for list items in S60 5th edition is there was a vain attempt to keep compatability? If you do actually want to live in a world where every manufacturer makes essentially one device and 'maintains compatability' forever and ever than fine. You should have a little think about the implications though…

  22. “This is absolutely subjective, but in my mind a “phone of the year” exemplifies the best product, not the stuffer that landed in the most stockings. If the latter were the case, why not nominate some shitty 2009 dumbphone that moved crazy units, too?”

    You've not caught on that the point of this article is that the 5800 does a lot for less (I don't understand what kind of wizardry you use to get the iPhone for $200 and then avoid the contract, but I assume it falls under 'theft'). It's not about price OR quality, it's about both put together.

    “If you've only got £200 to spend on a smartphone, settle for the HTC Hero with the full understanding that you're buying a 2008-level rehash with a headphone jack slapped on. Better yet, find a way to save up another £200 and invest in a smartphone worth owning.”

    On what planet does the HTC Hero cost £200?! I guess it's the same one you got that iPhone from.

    As for Nokia deliberately fragmenting software features, you do realise that one of the reasons why the 'two taps' interaction mode for list items in S60 5th edition is there was a vain attempt to keep compatability? If you do actually want to live in a world where every manufacturer makes essentially one device and 'maintains compatability' forever and ever than fine. You should have a little think about the implications though…

  23. If you re-read my post, you'll see that I said $199 on-contract (not off) for the 3GS, which is what it costs here — in response to James' sentiment that the 3GS was too expensive because it's “absolute minimum £300 – £400 either on PAYG or on contract.” I'll admit I'm not sure what a UMTS HTC Hero costs you guys over there; the CDMA version (which is the only 3G-capable version we can use here in the U.S.) is moving on eBay right now for $325 USD (£201), and since James didn't complain about the Hero's cost in his initial posting I'm assuming it's “fine” for the purpose of this abstract exercise where phones are crowned champion on the guise of some imaginary MSRP guideline.As for the Nokia predicament, I'm not talking S60 3rd vs. S60 5th and you know it. I own an E70-2 that will never see S60 3rd FP1 (or even the small updates the E70-1 saw, for no good reason), and an N82 that will never see FP2 even though the hardware is plenty capable. We regularly see mindbendingly poor choices with software exclusions, too: ask recent Eseries device owners how they like the Podcasting app situation.I'm not saying Google's gotten it right with Android, because there's absolutely fragmentation in that ecosystem. But it's quite plain to see that they've got a better software deployment path moving forward: Android Market vs. Ovi Store and a tangled mess of developer websites is a no-brainer decision. Additionally, HTC's Android devices — just like their Windows Mobile devices — are routinely hacked and updated courtesy of the folks at xda-developers, so we know there's at least -some- software upgrade path, even if Google and the manufacturer both fail to provide it.

  24. If you re-read my post, you'll see that I said $199 on-contract (not off) for the 3GS, which is what it costs here — in response to James' sentiment that the 3GS was too expensive because it's “absolute minimum £300 – £400 either on PAYG or on contract.” I'll admit I'm not sure what a UMTS HTC Hero costs you guys over there; the CDMA version (which is the only 3G-capable version we can use here in the U.S.) is moving on eBay right now for $325 USD (£201), and since James didn't complain about the Hero's cost in his initial posting I'm assuming it's “fine” for the purpose of this abstract exercise where phones are crowned champion on the guise of some imaginary MSRP guideline.

    As for the Nokia predicament, I'm not talking S60 3rd vs. S60 5th and you know it. I own an E70-2 that will never see S60 3rd FP1 (or even the small updates the E70-1 saw, for no good reason), and an N82 that will never see FP2 even though the hardware is plenty capable. We regularly see mindbendingly poor choices with software exclusions, too: ask recent Eseries device owners how they like the Podcasting app situation.

    I'm not saying Google's gotten it right with Android, because there's absolutely fragmentation in that ecosystem. But it's quite plain to see that they've got a better software deployment path moving forward: Android Market vs. Ovi Store and a tangled mess of developer websites is a no-brainer decision. Additionally, HTC's Android devices — just like their Windows Mobile devices — are routinely hacked and updated courtesy of the folks at xda-developers, so we know there's at least -some- software upgrade path, even if Google and the manufacturer both fail to provide it.

  25. Phone of year is samsung i8910 omnia hd!a fantastic amoled screen with amoled touchscreen..player with divx codec, very good camera for video and foto (not so much at 1280×720 in this moment, but maybe the best a 720×480!), gps very fast, phone very fast (cortex a8 cpu),nice interface with widget, task 3d, POSSIBILITY OF COOKING ROM AS WINDOWS MOBILE (first time for a symbian phone), radio fm with mp4 recording, very good music player with 5.1 surround feature,from january with kinetic scroll in every part of menù..THE BEST

  26. Phone of year is samsung i8910 omnia hd!a fantastic amoled screen with amoled touchscreen..player with divx codec, very good camera for video and foto (not so much at 1280×720 in this moment, but maybe the best a 720×480!), gps very fast, phone very fast (cortex a8 cpu),nice interface with widget, task 3d, POSSIBILITY OF COOKING ROM AS WINDOWS MOBILE (first time for a symbian phone), radio fm with mp4 recording, very good music player with 5.1 surround feature,from january with kinetic scroll in every part of menù..THE BEST

  27. I complete agree with you that the 5800 is the most underestimated device in Nokia's current portfolio. I also agree that the N86 is a phenomenal multimedia device. Pity that the networks did not support it so widely as you say. I would also add that the standard of feature devices running on proprietary interfaces has also vastly improved offering practicality and value for those simply wishing to have a right out of the box solution without being interested in customisation. 2010 will be a very interesting year in the development of all these product segments.

  28. I complete agree with you that the 5800 is the most underestimated device in Nokia's current portfolio. I also agree that the N86 is a phenomenal multimedia device. Pity that the networks did not support it so widely as you say.

    I would also add that the standard of feature devices running on proprietary interfaces has also vastly improved offering practicality and value for those simply wishing to have a right out of the box solution without being interested in customisation.

    2010 will be a very interesting year in the development of all these product segments.

  29. The 5530 is to the 5800, as the N97 mini is to the N97. So phone of the year would have to be the 5530; but for one thing; the Nokia 5630.

    It has even more features that either the 5800 or the 5530 and is only 83 grams. That is assuming you can do without a qwerty keypad. But it does have intelligent text input.

    Phone of the year is the Nokia 5630.

  30. Saying that non-touch devices “don’t qualify” is one of the most inane and obtuse comments I have read in a very long time. Anyone who has spent any quality time with a touch UI knows that, at this stage, they are a hinderance to usage. They are, currently, a gimmicky fad that MUST change, and change quickly, in order to survive. The feedback from hard keys CANNOT be replicated by even the most responsive touch UI and until they can touch UI’s are a flashy, pointless, labor-intensive, fiddly and downright crap way to use a phone. I should know. I own both the 5800 and the N97 mini and they pale into insignificance next to the N86 8MP and the N95 8GB (although the latter is beginning to get a bit creaky round the edges. Thinking about it the 5800 was creaky round the edges straight out of the box).

  31. The 5530 is to the 5800, as the N97 mini is to the N97. So phone of the year would have to be the 5530; but for one thing; the Nokia 5630. It has even more features that either the 5800 or the 5530 and is only 83 grams. That is assuming you can do without a qwerty keypad. But it does have intelligent text input.Phone of the year is the Nokia 5630.

  32. The 5530 is to the 5800, as the N97 mini is to the N97. So phone of the year would have to be the 5530; but for one thing; the Nokia 5630.

    It has even more features that either the 5800 or the 5530 and is only 83 grams. That is assuming you can do without a qwerty keypad. But it does have intelligent text input.

    Phone of the year is the Nokia 5630.

  33. Saying that non-touch devices “don't qualify” is most inane, obtuse comments I have read in a very long time. Anyone who has spent any quality time with a touch UI knows that, at this stage, they are a hinderance to usage. They are, currently, a gimmicky fad that MUST change, and change quickly, in order to survive. The feedback from hard keys CANNOT be replicated by even the most responsive touch UI and until they can touch UI's are a flashy, pointless, labor-intensive, fiddly and downright crap way to use a phone. I should know. I own both the 5800 and the N97 mini and they pale into insignificance next to the N86 8MP and the N95 8GB (although the latter is beginning to get a bit creaky round the edges. Thinking about it the 5800 was creaky round the edges straight out of the box).

  34. Saying that non-touch devices “don't qualify” is most inane, obtuse comments I have read in a very long time. Anyone who has spent any quality time with a touch UI knows that, at this stage, they are a hinderance to usage. They are, currently, a gimmicky fad that MUST change, and change quickly, in order to survive. The feedback from hard keys CANNOT be replicated by even the most responsive touch UI and until they can touch UI's are a flashy, pointless, labor-intensive, fiddly and downright crap way to use a phone. I should know. I own both the 5800 and the N97 mini and they pale into insignificance next to the N86 8MP and the N95 8GB (although the latter is beginning to get a bit creaky round the edges. Thinking about it the 5800 was creaky round the edges straight out of the box).

  35. woah! comment tastic post.
    i agree, as i bought a second one after i lost the first.

    it’s my back up second phone of delight. not perfect but kinda does the job. and occasionally saves my bacon.

  36. woah! comment tastic post.i agree, as i bought a second one after i lost the first.it's my back up second phone of delight. not perfect but kinda does the job. and occasionally saves my bacon.

  37. woah! comment tastic post.
    i agree, as i bought a second one after i lost the first.

    it's my back up second phone of delight. not perfect but kinda does the job. and occasionally saves my bacon.

  38. E71i for me in North America using AT&T. I bought the unlocked phone and moved the SIM from my older phone. E71i may not be a 2009 phone, but I bought it this year. It is the best phone among the smartphone category — best radio of them all I guess. The keyboard works very well for one or two thumbs. Great Symbian features like auto name lookup and long-press for number instead of text. Small enough to slip in your shirt pocket. Strong enough to survive regular falls out of the shirt pocket. Slim enough to put in your jeans pocket.

  39. E71i for me in North America using AT&T. I bought the unlocked phone and moved the SIM from my older phone. E71i may not be a 2009 phone, but I bought it this year. It is the best phone among the smartphone category — best radio of them all I guess. The keyboard works very well for one or two thumbs. Great Symbian features like auto name lookup and long-press for number instead of text. Small enough to slip in your shirt pocket. Strong enough to survive regular falls out of the shirt pocket. Slim enough to put in your jeans pocket.

  40. E71i for me in North America using AT&T. I bought the unlocked phone and moved the SIM from my older phone. E71i may not be a 2009 phone, but I bought it this year. It is the best phone among the smartphone category — best radio of them all I guess. The keyboard works very well for one or two thumbs. Great Symbian features like auto name lookup and long-press for number instead of text. Small enough to slip in your shirt pocket. Strong enough to survive regular falls out of the shirt pocket. Slim enough to put in your jeans pocket.

  41. N900 obviously!!! Ppl don’t need a year to try/test a cellphone >.< it was release in 2009 so!!!

  42. N900 obviously!!! Ppl don't need a year to try/test a cellphone >.<it was release in 2009 so!!!

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